Lifestyle: Elon Musk said Tesla stopped selling 'full self-driving' hardware online because customers were confused (TSLA)

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Tesla CEO Elon Musk.

Tesla CEO Elon Musk said on Wednesday that Tesla stopped selling self-driving hardware on its website because customers were confused. Last week, Musk said the option would be available "off menu" for a week, but on Wednesday suggested the feature would remain available to those who asked for it.

Francois Mori / Associated Press

  • Tesla CEO Elon Musk said on Wednesday that Tesla stopped selling self-driving hardware on its website because customers were confused.
  • Last week, Musk said via Twitter that the option would be available "off menu" for a week, but on Wednesday suggested the feature would remain available to those who asked for it.
  • In May, a Tesla representative told Business Insider that its customers had not expressed confusion about the language on its website describing Autopilot's capabilities.

Tesla CEO Elon Musk said on Wednesday that Tesla stopped selling self-driving hardware on its website because customers were confused.

For $3,000 (or $5,000 if purchased after delivery), customers can double the number of cameras on their vehicles from four to eight, which Tesla says will give them the ability to drive without human assistance once the necessary software is ready and receives regulatory approval. The automaker had sold the hardware as "full self-driving capability" on its website, but said it didn't know when the accompanying self-driving software would become available.

Tesla began selling the feature in October 2016, but removed the option from its website last week. On October 18, Musk said via Twitter that the option would be available "off menu" for a week, but on Wednesday suggested the feature would remain available to those who asked for it. He said Tesla removed the option from its website because customers couldn't distinguish between it and Autopilot, the automaker's semi-autonomous driver assistance system.

"People didn’t understand the difference between enhanced Autopilot and full self-driving," Musk said. "But anyone who asks for it can certainly get it, and it really ends up being a discount on future capability."

In May, a Tesla representative told Business Insider that its customers had not expressed confusion about the language on its website describing Autopilot's capabilities.

"The feedback that we get from our customers shows that they have a very clear understanding of what Autopilot is, how to properly use it, and what features it consists of," the representative said.

Have a Tesla news tip? Contact this reporter at mmatousek@businessinsider.com.

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